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With Sri Lanka’s strategic location providing for international and region connectivity, it will remain a key maritime and logistics hub. Even with its proximity to all major ports of the Indian subcontinent, the port of Colombo still stands its ground as the maritime port of choice for many trading routes. Its superior infrastructure compared to that of its immediate neighbour as well as some of the best in the South Asian region with heavy investments in upgrading seaports, its airports as well as other logistical infrastructure.

The likes of Colombo Port Expansion Project (CEPP) has been extended by 600 hectares to facilitate three new terminals, whereas the Hambantota Port Phase II is underway, with the harbour offering zero deviation for international shipping routes. In terms of airports, the Bandaranaike International Airport is undergoing changes with its Phase II Stage II is undergoing renovations and expansions, whereas the Mattala Rajapaksa International Airport (MRIA) offers logistical support closer to the Hambantota Port. Other logistical infrastructure available in Sri Lanka includes the likes of the Western Region Megapolis Planning Project (WRMPP) and Colombo International Financial City (CIFC).

Sri Lanka has made many efforts to improve its infrastructure and connections between key players in the freight market, especially to provide connectivity in regional connectivity and transport in South Asia. With this improvement to boosting regional transport, competitiveness and economic growth is a clear result. With the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation declaring the period between 2010 and 2020 as the “Decade of Intra-Regional Connectivity in SAARC”, more and more efforts have been taken into developing transport infrastructure and transit facilities.

With Sri Lanka chairing the Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) since August 2018, there have been many efforts to improve on economic integration as well as   enter into Global Value Chains as well as Free Trade Agreements (that have been in discussion for the past 15 years. Apart from its BIMSTEC initiatives, Sri Lanka should also focus on strengthening ties with South Asian players via pursuing various other FTA with the goal of reducing barriers to GVC integrations.  Discussions with China can assist in strengthening ties towards the Belt and Road Initiative to lead to market access for Sri Lanka export players. Sri Lanka’s closest neighbour, India, especially the southern states provide for great export potentials and start-ups. One of the requirements for Sri Lanka have been the need for a deep sea container terminal which was  highlighted by India as a need for BIMSTEC countries to strengthen their routes.

Posted by & filed under Freight News.

With growing challenges in freight and supply chain measures, the Australian Transport and Infrastructure Council recently endorsed both the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy and the National Action Plan back in August of this year. The strategy and the action plan has set out a clear agenda for all freight types or modes of transportation the nation over for the next twenty years in mind.

The National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy is committed to addressing four areas that are considered critical. These include rolling out smarter and targeted infrastructure, enabling improved efficiencies in supply chain, better planning, coordination and regulation, as well as better freight location and performance data. These are considered the critical areas that will be addressed in the first 5 years of the 20-year action plan.

With volumes expected to grow by 35% by 2040 (which equates to 270 billons tonnes), the total volume that Australia will need to prepare for would be over 1000 billion tonnes in total volume. Thus to ensure the nation is on point, the following exerts are from the National Action Plan which have been devised to address outcomes that the council hopes to achieve.

Smarter and Targeted Infrastructure

  • Ensure that domestic and international supply chains are serviced by resilient and efficient key freight corridors, precincts and assets
  • Provide regional and remote Australia with infrastructure capable of connecting regions and communities to major gateways, through land links, regional airports or coastal shipping
  • Identify and support digital infrastructure and communication services necessary for improved and innovative supply chains
  • Advance heavy vehicle road reform to facilitate efficient investment in infrastructure

Enabling Improved Supply Chain Efficiency

  • Adopt and implement national and global standards, and support common platforms, to reduce transaction costs and support interoperability along supply chains
  • Promote training and re-skilling of industry and government workforces appropriate to current and future needs
  • Facilitate new and innovative technologies that improve freight outcomes and understand the deployment, skills and workforce requirements for operators and infrastructure
  • Build community acceptance of freight operations

Better Planning, Coordination And Regulation

  • Ensure freight demand is integrated in transport and land use planning across and between jurisdiction boundaries and freight modes
  • Strengthen the consideration of freight in all other government planning and decision-making
  • Investigate policy, planning and operational solutions to improve freight access and movement along domestic and international supply chains
  • Improve regulation to be more outcomes focused and risk-based to support innovation and reduce regulatory burden whilst maintaining safety, security and sustainability

Better Freight Location and Performance Data

  • Develop an evidence-based view of key freight flows and supply chains and their comparative performance to drive improved government and industry decision-making, investment and operations

Read the full National Freight and Supply Chain : National Action Plan Document courtesy of the Transport and Infrastructure Council.

Posted by & filed under Freight Solutions.

When it comes to freight, there are many modes of transport, be it air freight, sea freight and road freight, as well as various requirements and situations that call for it, from personal effects shipping to commercial cargo.  Depending on your freight requirement and country of origin, there are things you need to know. Of course, in case you want the entire service carried out by a reliable freight solutions company such as Transco Cargo with its offering of Customs Brokering Services, then you are taken care of. However, in case you wanted to be a little informed on the ins and outs of the freight world, here are some things you should be aware of, such as standard freight documents and procedures.

With personal effects shipping from Australia with Transco Cargo, there are many freight solutions and services provided to make life easier for you, especially when you are moving (to another country altogether). From supplying you with the necessary boxes and crates to house your personal effects for safe shipping, as well as offering short to long term warehousing should you require it, to carefully dispatching your goods to their destination and more, you can be assured of Transco Cargo’s commitment to the motto ‘We Love to Deliver’.

You are able to handle the documentation side of using Transco Cargo as your freight solutions provider by merely logging onto the internet and visiting the online freight documents download section to find the documentation you will need for personal effects shipping (along with forms that need to be filled out according to the country your are shipping to). These documents include the likes of the Shipping Declaration Form, Door Delivery Service Agreement (when signing up for this shipping service in Sri Lanka), and Packing List (a mandatory document required for Customs Clearance when shipping goods to India).

Personal Effects Shipping Documents

The Shipping Declaration Form is required when handing over your goods for shipping. It’s important that all information is accurately documented, and the sender and receiver’s names and addresses are clearly stated and labelled on the packages, as well as the boxes/crates are secured, nailed and/or taped down for secure shipping to your destination of choice.

The Door Delivery Service Agreement is required to make sure your personal effects reach their destination in Sri Lanka safely, and require the shipper to specify all the information Transco International may need to deliver it to the consignee.

The Packing List is essential for customs clearance in India, therefore take good care to mention all your items as well as shipper and consignee information too.

Posted by & filed under Blog, Freight Solutions.

We’ve all been there. Where, you ask? Well, trying to figure out how to get your cargo or goods cleared through customs. If you don’t know what to do, we have some insight for you. Clearing your cargo through customs involves procedures that need to be followed whether you are importing merchandise or shipping goods to the world. It’s always a good idea to hire a Cargo Customs Broker to assist you along the way, or frankly, just handle it all together.

There are many instances where a Customs Broker comes in handy. One instance would be if you are shipping cargo out to the world, and another if you are receiving cargo from overseas. There are so many procedures you need to handle, a lot of paperwork to fill, as well as a lot of payments that need to be taken care of which includes taxes and tariffs too. Essentially, through a cargo customs brokerage service you can get help to get all of this done, without a fuss.

At Transco Cargo, you can be assured that assistance will be provided with utmost care and commitment. From all the documentation that you will require for government customs regulations for import and export of goods, materials and merchandise, to payments of taxes, tariffs and excises; it will all be taken care of so that you need not worry. Your time is valuable to us as it is to you, and we make sure that it isn’t wasted by handling all the dealings of clearing your imports/exports through customs, if you choose us at Transco Cargo.

But that’s not all that is offered to you. Transco Cargo is part of Transco International, and with it more value added services can be extended to our clients by offering a hand-in-hand offer, a two-for-one or a ‘twofer’ as some call it. Not only will Transco Cargo act as a Customs Broker but also help you in collecting/delivering your goods and merchandise to the necessary location/destination. How convenient is that? The best part is Transco has the ability to even offer their containers and other services too, from start to finish.

Basically, Transco will have your goods safely reach its destination with the required exports and customs requirements fulfilled and alternatively collect and deliver any imported merchandise, ensure that it is cleared through customs and all import fees have been paid before reaching its final destination.  Other services offered under the Transco International umbrella include Air, Sea and Post Clearances, Tariff Valuation & Consulting, Tariff Concession Applications, and Tariff Classification Advice. Transco Cargo is truly the one-stop shop for all your shipping needs. Get a free quote today!

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It is always a good rule of thumb to know where you stuff is, whether you are looking at your personal or monetary possessions. Clearly knowing exactly what you have and where is considered being responsible. Thus, when it comes to wanting to track cargo shipments, having an easy way of doing so goes a long way.

Primarily choosing responsible and reliable shipping company is the first step towards a good transaction.  You can track cargo shipments in a few ways. One would be via your freight forwarders website such as Transco Cargo’s cargo tracking feature. Another would be via third party websites. Let us first talk about how Transco Cargo offers you the option to track cargo shipments with ease. All you need is either your B/L number or VIN number. When you get onto the Transco Cargo website, on the bottom right corner, you will find yourself with the following floating box, which offers you the option to enter in either a B/L number or the VIN number in order to track cargo shipments sent via Transco Cargo.

Track Cargo Shipments via B/L Number

First and foremost, the “B/L” stands for Bill of Lading, which is issued for any cargo, and issued during the shipping process acting as a unique identification method for the shipment in question.  The B/L number is made up of 15 characters, often which the first four character represents the carrier. Its simple.

Track Cargo Shipments via VIN Number

For those who have chosen to ship automobiles via sea freight, then you can opt to use the VIN number. When it comes to auto shipping, you can do this in two major ways. One is using the RO –RO system, which stands for Roll On/Roll Off. The vehicle in question is driven onto the vessel and driven off at the destination. The other would be transporting it within a container. Both these shipping options can be tracked via the VIN number.

It’s that easy. Get ease of mind by being able to track cargo shipments from wherever you are with click.

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Avoid the holiday rush so that you don’t get overwhelmed during Christmas time by ordering early. Many of us opt to look for deals online, going as far as importing from China. If you run a business, you can make use of the great discounts as well as take advantages of sea freight. So how do you go about getting the best from holiday shipping from China? Whether you have Christmas items on your list to buy or need to buy items for the Christmas rush, the holiday shopping from China can be easy provided you get in early.  Even if you do run an online shop, having the necessary stocks at hand for the holidays is also important.  There are a few factors to consider, these include the likes of the following.

Ordering Early for Holiday Shipping from China

The time to order for your holiday shipping from China is now especially if you want to receive your goods by Christmas is now! If you are planning to use sea freight then you need to keep aside six to twelve weeks ensuring it gets to you in time. Don’t forget that there are others too attempting to the same as you, so keep those in mind, especially with the likes of season delays.

Considering Production

If you are ordering specific items, then you need to also factor in time for production turnaround/lead times. Keeping a small buffer time can also give you enough time account for any unforeseen hiccups that may or may not occur. Ideally it would be best that you choose a supplier who has ready stocks that are shippable immediately thus making your holiday shipping from China.

Choosing Suppliers Carefully when Holiday Shipping from China

A good rule of thumb when choosing suppliers in any scenario is to be careful and vet them properly. When you are dealing with international shipments, it is imperative you do your research. This can be on product quality, customer service and as well as reliability.  Lead times/production times also differ from supplier to supplier and those must be considered before making an order. Being clear with expectations with your supplier and opening up communication for a smoother working relationship can ensure a smoother process altogether.

Posted by & filed under Freight News.

Maritime exploration and trade first began as early as 3000BCand it was during the Arab age of discovery between the 3rd-7th centuries when the modern maritime global trade and shipping began.  The development of global trade over the years has made its many impacts on the shipping industry, whereby if one region of the globe is doing well, its mirrors onto the opposing side. This is usually the case; let’s dig down deeper to explain.

Global trade development can be monitored by paying close attention to the global economic centre of gravity that is calculated with weighting countries by their GDP (Gross Domestic Product). Based on figuring out the centre of gravity, the most potent of economic regions can be sought out, with a shift from Europe towards Asia in the past decade, with China being the centre of gravity well into 2025, as per market analyses carried out of the firm KPMG.

This trend also resonates with the global trade shipping industry, with 61% of sea cargo deliveries unloading in Asian seaports, whilst Asian seaports are loading approximately 40% as well. The significant of the Asian region with global trade and shipping can be highlighted especially with the likes of China and other Asian countries that influence finance factors such as with export credit agencies (or ECAs).

Ports under Asian companies are also focusing on refurbishment and development of ports to expand their capabilities such as to receive shipments via ULCV/S which stand for Ultra Large Container Vessels/Shipments.  Being one of the most utilised types of vessels by major shipping companies, which amounts to almost half of the currently available 20ft equivalent units for shipments, this has place pressure on port authorities to develop their ports to facilitate the servicing of the likes of ULCV/S.

The shipping industry and global trade also has to react to regulations being introduced such as the LSF2020 which is an initiative to reduce the fuel sulphur content from 3.5% to 0.5%.  Many shipping companies have tackled this by shifting to liquefied natural gas or LNG as a more beneficial alternative with a long-term viability. Thus, ports will also be required to include LNG terminals to service ships whilst attempting to stay relevant and on par with the trends and regulations of the shipping industry.

Apart from the above, dynamic global players are also affecting the temperature of the shipping industry. From development of port operators to strategies, the likes of a dynamic global player such as DP World as emerged on top as one of the leading terminal operators with sights on reshaping the industry.

What are your thoughts on the developments of global trade and its impacts on the shipping industry?

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With concern to sea freight where are two options of container shipping services that you use. One is less than container load (LCL) which is ideal for smaller shipments that would not be able to fit a smaller container. The other would be when you fill up an entire container (be it a 20ft or 40ft shipping container), which is referred to as full container load (FCL) shipping. Knowing the shipping container specifications ahead of time, will allow you to understand some of the sea freight basics being how much cargo do you need to fill a container.

To figure out what type of container to use for your next business shipment via sea freight, you should know that there are many different types and sizes of shipping containers to choose from that will suit your business requirement. If you know the shipping container specifications for the options available to you, it will allow for good business decisions moving forward.  Based on the shipping container specifications, such as the dimensions and the maximum weight allowed, it can have an impact on the type of equipment you are able to ship. The following shipping container specifications are meant to act as guides for you as you choose your freight container for shipping.

 

Container Type Internal Dimensions Door Opening Cubic Capacity Cargo Weight
20FT General L – 5.89M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.36M

W – 2.33M

H – 2.26M

33 CBM 21700KG
20FT High Cube L – 5.89M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.69M

W – 2.33M

H – 2.59M

37 CBM 21700KG
 40FT General L – 12.05M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.36M

W – 2.33M

H – 2.26M

66 CBM  26500KGS
 40FT High Cube L – 12.05M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.69M

 W – 2.33M

H – 2.59M

 76 CBM  26500KGS

 

It should be noted that heavy rated (that supports heavier loads) as well as food grade shipping container are also available, but may incur an additional charge. The high cube variety is only available for certain origin/destinations and should inquired if needed and carry an additional charge.

Apart from the above shipping containers, flat rack shipping containers are also available.

 

Container Type Internal Dimensions Door Opening Cubic Capacity Cargo Weight
20FT Flat Rack

with sides

L – 5.89M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.23M

Side Opening

W – 2.59M

30 CBM 26500KG
20FT Flat Rack

without sides

L – 6.00M

W – 2.35M

H – 0.23M

33 CBM

(Max Height 2.36M)

23500KG
 40FT Flat Rack

with sides

L – 12.05M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.23M

Side Opening

W – 11.66M

63 CBM  36000KGS
 40FT Flat Rack

without sides

L – 12.20M

W – 2.35M

H – 0.65M

67 CBM

(Max Height 2.36M)

 3000KGS

 

These type of container are ideal when shipping cargo that bypass dimensions of a traditional shipping container as it is available with or without sides. They do incur an additional charge and are often subject to availability.

 

Container Type Internal Dimensions Door Opening Cubic Capacity Cargo Weight
20FT Open Top L – 5.89M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.36M

W – 2.33M

H – 2.29M

32 CBM 21700KG
40FT Open Top L – 12.05M

W – 2.35M

H – 2.36M

 W – 2.33M

H – 2.29M

66 CBM 26500KG

 

The above open top type of shipping containers, allow you to ship cargo that surpasses the height restrictions of a standard shipping container.

 

Container Type Internal Dimensions Door Opening Cubic Capacity Cargo Weight
20FT Reefer L – 5.44M

W – 2.26M

H – 2.24M

W – 2.26M

H – 2.20M

27 CBM 21700KG
40FT Reefer L – 11.55M

W – 2.26M

H – 2.24M

 W – 2.26M

H – 2.20M

58 CBM 25000KG

 

Reefer containers are refrigerated and set at a specific temperature for the journey commonly used for dairy and food cargo.  Due to their thick walls, the dimensions of these containers are smaller.

Get in touch with Transco Cargo to find out how we can serve your business freight needs. Drop us a quick inquiry!

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When preparing your export shipment, for instance, in the event you are sending out samples to potential international customers/buyers, you should be aware of a few things. One such element would be the shipment weight and the documentation required. In this blog, we look at these important items on your to do list when preparing your export shipment.

Preparing Your Export Shipment: Weight

it should be noted that by regulations of the IATA, in the event that the volumetric weight is greater than the actual weight of the export shipment, then the cost of the export shipment is calculated based on the space that the consignment will take up in the aircraft carrier. The way you calculate your volumetric weight is simply by multiplying the length by the height and then the width of the shipment in centimeters, and thereafter dividing it by 5,000.

Preparing your Export Shipment: Required Documentation

One thing that is needed in any type of shipment would be the required shipping documentation. In an instance of preparing your export shipment by air, there are two types of documentation required; the waybill and the invoice.

Waybill

When preparing your export shipment by air, you are required to have a fully completed waybill and thereafter a label fixed to the consignment. This will ensure the successful movement of the export shipment and be able to track its progress effectively. If you have more than one item in your consignment, each item will be numbered accordingly.

Invoice

Your shipment will also require customs documentation such as a commercial or a pro-forma invoice. This is compulsory when you send an export shipment that contains items other than documents to other countries. This is essentially a declaration of the export shipment’s contents which will help authorities assess the duties and/or taxes that should be levied against it. A commercial invoice is needed for any export shipments that are intended for commercial transactions/resale, whereas a proforma invoice is used when export shipments with goods of no commercial value are sent (such as in the case of samples).

Stay tuned for next week’s blog, Breaking Down a Commercial Invoice.

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It’s no surprise that the constant back and forth between the US and China have raised concerns with the rest of the world. If you stop to think about it, there are many potential impacts on the shipping industry that have been caused by the US and Chinese tariffs, along with Europe thrown into the chaos. In this blog, we look at what these potential impacts on the so shipping industry are.

To give a little insight into the China-United States Trade War, it began last year in 2018 via the increase of US and Chinese tariffs amongst other things.  The background for these disputes comes to the fact there were several disagreements with the Trump administration that preceded to what the US is now calling defensive measures. The imposition of tariffs on Chinese goods was said to be a result of the so-called unfair Chinese trade practices over the course of several years.  This includes tariffs set for over 1,300 Chinese products. Thereafter, China responded by imposing tariffs on nearly 130 US imported products.

These were followed by different trade talks whereby in August of 2018, exactly one year ago, China made a formal complaint to the World Trade Organisation whereby the tariffs imposed on Solar Panels will destabilise the international market for solar related products. However, during the G20 Osaka Summit, the Chinese government stated that they would call a truce on the trade war with prior tariffs remaining in place but no future tariffs will be applicable with negotiations restarting. During this time, the Trump administration allowed US companies to deal with Huawei but the company will remain blacklisted.  However, earlier this month, Trump went on twitter to declare that a further 10% tariff will be levied on the balance $300 billion of goods, and the Treasury has declared China a Currency Manipulator, which has then resulted in China ordering state-owned companies to put a halt in purchasing US agriculture products.

When the US and Chinese tariffs first came to effect in July 2018, there was a positive reaction as it ended the uncertainty that the global market was expecting. However, by early August, China was the first to experience the fallout by stepping down to the third largest market capitalisation player. Thereafter in December of 2018, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell declining by 600 points. There were potential impacts to the shipping market caused by the trade war especially when it came down to the import of products to China, with shifting their focus from the US to Brazil for their import of soybeans (which had a 25% tariff).

Despite the imposed US and Chinese tariffs, China declared a record high annual trade surplus ($323.32 billion), whereas in March 2019, the US declared a record high trade deficit of $621 billion; the highest since a decade ago. China also hit back by reducing tariffs for non-US exporters thus putting the United States at a competitive disadvantage due to the US and Chinese tariff trade war.

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